Simple Guide – Different Types Of Drywall Tape

If you are on the search for different types of drywall tape, look no further. The construction industry is adapting to provide newer products out there to make your job or DIY project easier. Whereas many years ago, different types of drywall tape didn’t exist. Homes used to be made of plaster and lath, until drywall was more widely accepted somewhere around the 1950s. As of the date of this article, I’ve researched and found 8 different types of drywall tape you can compare to see which will work out best for you. Each of them has its own uses, and pros and cons.

For those of you who do not know me, I’m Joe. I’ve been dry walling and finishing for many years now. When I first began my business, I was overwhelmed with how many different types of drywall tape exist. I have personally used all of these different types of drywall tape except one. I am always on the search for new products to add to this list, if you have seen anything else out there – please let me know in the comments below. I monitor and add content as needed and personally reply to any comments.

If you are new to the different types of drywall tape, I want to point out that there many different uses that I have outlined below from first-hand experience!

Different Types of Drywall Tape – Paper Tape

Paper tape is the most widely used and accepted type of drywall tape there is. It is always used on new construction builds and remodels and sometimes it will be used when patching. Paper tape is not very difficult to apply. The most common concern when using paper tape is that it may bubble if it isn’t applied correctly.

Used For: New construction, Remodels, and Patching, Flat Joints, Butt Joints, Corners

Pros: Strong, Effective, Efficient, Usable on Flat Joints, Butt Joints, and Corners, Usable with Automatic Drywall Tools, Lowest Cost per Linear Ft.

Cons: If not applied correctly, it will bubble. If you have already applied paper tape and have a bubble, it will need to be cut out with a sheetrock knife and reapplied.

As an Amazon Affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Different Types of Drywall Tape – Self-Adhesive Mesh

Self-Adhesive Mesh Tape is the second most used different type of drywall tape. It is most often used for patching drywall, but there are times when I have used this on butt joints for new builds. This different type of drywall tape has a very good advantage for beginners or DIYers. The name says it, it is self-adhesive. It doesn’t have to have mud to stick to a wall. Simply apply the tape, then cover it with a joint compound.

Used For: New construction, Remodels, and Patching, Flat Joints and Butt Joints

Pros: Strong, Self-Adhesive, Easier Learning Curve, No Bubbles

Cons: Cannot Be Used On Corners, Moderate Cost per Linear Foot

I do want to point out that there is a brother/sister to regular self-adhesive mesh tape; Mold Resistant Mesh Tape. Mold Resistant Mesh Tape isn’t required, but it can be used in kitchens, bathrooms, and basements if you have a concern about mold.

As an Amazon Affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Different Types of Drywall Tape – FibaFuse

I’ve used FibaFuse just as frequently as Paper Tape. This is one of the newest different types of drywall tape on the market. It is a paperless tape, in fact, made out of fiberglass. So, if you plan on using FibaFuse, I would definitely recommend using gloves! It works well with patchwork. I have never used this on a new construction build as the paper tape is the most cost effective, easier, and quicker. This product can be used with all compounds, but it is my preference and many others that FibaFuse and “hot mud” (Easy sand) are unbeatable for patchwork.

Uses: Mainly patching, Works Best with “Hot Mud” Application, Flat Joints, and Butt Joints.

Pros: Doesn’t Bubble, Stronger than Paper, Mold Resistant, Usable with Automatic Tools

Cons: Cannot be Used on Corners, Made of Fiberglass (wear gloves), Moderate Cost

FibaFuse has also come out with a newer and stronger product, FibaFuse Max. The main difference between the two is that FibaFuse Max is boasted to maximize crack resistance.

As an Amazon Affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Fire Tape Mudless Drywall Joint Tape

Out of all of the different types of drywall tape listed here, this is a product I have no firsthand experience with. From what I’ve researched, it is mainly used in commercial builds. It has a 1-2 hour fire rating, meaning it is fire resistant. It is mostly used for ceiling grids and engineering rooms. There is no information on whether or not this product can have mud applied over it for a flat finish

Uses: Mainly Commercial, Fire Resistant, Flat Joints, and Butt Joints

Pros: 1-2 Hour Fire Resistance, Self-Adhesive, No Mud required

Cons: The manufacturer doesn’t specify whether mud can be applied over it for a flatter finish, priced higher than different types of drywall tape.

As an Amazon Affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Strait Flex – Perfect 90

This is also a newer different type of drywall tape.  I have used this many times and I can say it is a great product to use for corners when compared to paper tape.  It is paper laminated and made of a composite material.  It is used to get perfect corners.  It also cuts finishing time in half, due to the fact that it only requires one coat of joint compound after applying.  The only downside to using this product is that it is typically 4x the cost of paper tape per roll.  However, if you are new to taping corners this will eliminate any worry of not making a straight corner.

Uses: New Construction, Remodels, Patching, Corners only

Pros: 2x Strength as Paper or Mesh, Made of Composite Material, Cuts Finishing Time In Half

Cons: Typically 4x the cost of different types of drywall tape.

As an Amazon Affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

NoCoat – Ultraflex

NoCoat is a go-to for many drywallers in the industry.  It is very easy to use, and one of the most durable corners on the market.  I’ve also used this product many times but mostly I use this for when a corner is an off 90° angle.  Meaning it is either above or below 90°.  If I am ever repairing loose tape from a vaulted ceiling, this is the best product for it.

Uses: New construction, Remodels, Any Angle Corner, Patching

Pros: Makes Any Angle Easy, Great for Vault Ceilings and Corners, Durable and Strong

Cons: Price, Hard to Find in Chain Stores (HomeDepot/Lowes)

As an Amazon Affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Those Are The Different Types of Drywall Tape

Depending on your project needs, this article provides the different types of drywall tape to use for any project.  I hope all of the different types of drywall tape listed above will help you complete your home project. If you’re on the search for different taping knife sets, check out my article, Best Drywall Taping Tool set – A Professional Drywallers Guide.

What project are you working on? What different types of drywall tape have you used or did you end up using?  Let me know in the comments below!

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.